Queen Deanie Rescued Pit – {Darien, GA Pet Photographer}

 

Pit Dog Portrait!

 

 

Is that a Pit Bull? Yep, the sweetest Pit Ever.. Her name is Queen Deany! Queen Deanie was rescued from the woods of McIntosh County on December 20, 2009, exhibiting “the works” – skeletal, mangy, parasite-ridden (including advanced heartworms) and scared to death! She had obviously recently given birth, but no pups could be found. One year later, she is an exquisite specimen of the Staffordshire Terrier, the first of the “bully breeds” we’ve ever personally had the pleasure of loving. She is absolutely the sweetest, calmest, most obedient dog to ever grace our household, but she deserves to be in a home with fewer “siblings” (she gets along beautifully with all of our dogs), no cats, and a guardian who has the time to spoil her rotten. Parting with our Queen Deanie would create a huge emotional void for us, but we want the absolute best for her.

 


Dog Family Pack Christmas Card

 

 

About their Pack

(Front row, left to right)
Scooby was picked up by McIntosh County Animal Services (MCAS) in the Fall of 2005, a cruelty case covered in ticks and fleas and Demodectic mange. Hannah brought him home, along with a litter of 3 tiny black puppies, all scheduled to be killed because they had mange. Fast forward 5 years and Scooby and one of the trio (quickly dubbed “The Rinky Dinks” by Andy) is still with us. Scooby is a big, once-lanky (but now 80 pounds), super-friendly, furball of pure Goofus, adored by all!

Little Hannah is our “Dog From Hell”. Andy found her at the Darien dump on a scorching hot day in July of 2003: a pitiful, nearly-dead, starved, mangy, puppy about two months old. First stop was to a local vet who said, “Andy, if you leave her here overnight, you’ll have to give her a name”; to which Andy answered, “Just call her Little Hannah.” Not only has her name turned out to be an embarrassment, her behavior is despicable. She’s sneaky, rules the pack, cavorts shamelessly with our two big males, and will occasionally bite a visitor.

Traveler, AKA “Crazy Brown Dog”, was picked up by MCAS as a stray on December 12, 2005. On Friday, January 13, 2006, 19 dogs were euthanized. Traveler was on the kill list, but sometimes Thursday night, he escaped from his run! He spent two months on the road and when Andy and I arrived home from a short trip to Charleston, Traveler was waiting for us inside our fenced yard. He’d rather ride in the back of Andy’s pickup truck (tethered, of course) than breathe, and barks for the entire duration of his joy rides! “There goes that old man and his crazy brown dog!” is a comment that’s been heard around town on more than one occasion.

Our Big Boy Shoney is one of The Rinky Dinks rescued with Scooby in November of 2005. Although they were lovingly reared from Day One by us, they never outgrew their lack of confidence. The male of the trio, Shoney grew into an athletic, very-Lab-looking boy, but has had two expensive ACL surgeries. One sister was adopted by a good lady in Coweta County, but habitually climbed her fence and was killed by a car. Sadly, her sister, Clemmie, met the same fate on April 8, 2008, when she slipped through our gate as I entered with arms loaded, to chase whatever wild things lurked in the woods at night. We’ll never quit missing our Darlin’ Clementine.

Queen Deanie was rescued from the woods of McIntosh County on December 20, 2009, exhibiting “the works” – skeletal, mangy, parasite-ridden (including advanced heartworms) and scared to death! She had obviously recently given birth, but no pups could be found. One year later, she is an exquisite specimen of the Staffordshire Terrier, the first of the “bully breeds” we’ve ever personally had the pleasure of loving. She is absolutely the sweetest, calmest, most obedient dog to ever grace our household, but she deserves to be in a home with fewer “siblings” (she gets along beautifully with all of our dogs), no cats, and a guardian who has the time to spoil her rotten. Parting with our Queen Deanie would create a huge emotional void for us, but we want the absolute best for her.

Odie (with Andy) was caught in a cat trap we set deep in the woods of Odum, GA. On a quick trip to Atlanta in February of this year, we spotted a small, black and white adult dog running all over a four-lane highway. Going to and coming from Atlanta, we tried unsuccessfully to catch the little fellow. We made several trips (55 miles each way) back to the site where we’d last seen the dog to leave food and set a trap. Five days later, we caught “a dog” – not the dog we had seen, but a skinny, full-grown, tan and black waif with a withered back leg caused by an old, badly-healed break. Odie now runs on 4 good legs, is heartworm free, spayed and the absolute apple of Andy Tostensen’s eye! To use a popular expression, they are just about “joined at the hip.”

Jitterbug (with Hannah) is proof positive that Hannah is a certified Foster Flunkout! Pulled from MCAS in June of this year, he was scheduled to go on a transport to New York, but the wait time between the pulling and the trip was just long enough for Hannah to fall hopelessly in love! Within five minutes of meeting this cockey, hyper, mouthy little mutt, Hannah named him Jitterbug, and the name fits him to a T! He’s one cool little dude who has no earthly idea he is a squirt! At 10.5 pounds, he romps with the big dogs and tries with all his might to convince them he is the Alpha! When he’s not policing the pack, he’s bouncing at his “Momma’s” knees, begging to be picked up. At bedtime each night, he can be found between the sheets, snuggled next to Odie, both flanked by “Mom and Dad”.

Townsend is our senior citizen. We picked her and her mom up on Route 57, between the towns of Townsend and Ludowici, GA, in February of 1999. Several months later, we found a great home for Ludowici and she led a charmed life until her recent passing. Townsend is one of the sweetest, most humble dogs imaginable, but for some reason, her place on the family doggy totem pole has always been on the bottom. She’s not the brightest star in the sky and her chunky, low-to-the ground body led us to nickname her “The White Hog” (although we never call her that within earshot for fear of hurting her tender feelings.) I have always wished she could be someone’s little princess in a single-dog home, and perhaps she’s dreamed of that, as well. But she’s never complained about a thing and seems thankful for what she has.

Miss Lady lived on a short chain in the dirt from the time she was 6 weeks old until she came to live with us in June of 2008. Just 2 years old then, her behavior was shaped in those formative years: a nervous, high-strung, fearful little girl; yet inquisitive, feminine and wanting to trust. We never intended to keep her, but hoped instead to find her a loving home. However, her easily excitable nature didn’t stand to improve in our multiple-dog household, and her anxiety levels will quickly escalate to the point where she may snap or even bite in a frenzied setting. Yes, another “special needs” dogs; but we understand her and have grown to love her very much.

Mattie Boy and Pattie came to us about 3 years ago, after Andy’s sister, Sue, passed away. Sue adored her cats and after her death, no one would take them. The alternative was to take them to the pound. Andy and I found this totally unacceptable, so that’s how we inherited a handsome, 18 pound, twelve-year-old orange Tabby (Mattie Boy) and a very petite, shy, part Calico little lady about 12 years’ old (Patches, whom we have shortened to Patti). Mattie and Patti never go outside, but have the entire front of our home to themselves, separated from the back of our home (via baby gates) and the “dog demons”. It took a long time for them to adjust to their new home, but they are very comfortable with us now. Their morning and evening toilette is followed by lots of brushing, petting and gentle conversation.

Natalie was once a feral cat who lived in the woods adjacent to our home. After spotting an occasional kitty in or near our carport a few years ago, we began leaving food out for them each night. Eventually, we trapped a beautiful Calico that we tamed, fully vetted, named Millie after my mother, and gave to my brother. Miss Natalie followed Millie, and must not have been a true feral, because she moved quickly into our hearts, our home, and our lives. Prior to our taking in Deanie, Odie and Jitterbug, Natalie pretty well ruled the roost! She’s more wary now with our pack of 9, but still comes and goes much as she pleases, and often sleeps with us at night. Her head lists to the right a bit and her tail is shy about 4 inches and curls at the end like a pig’s! Her stunning gray and white markings – complete with a beauty mark near her nose – make her a real standout. Natalie will stay outside for hours, then make a beeline for her litter box the minute she comes in the house. We figure she prefers indoor plumbing!

 

Jeannie Reeves Photography
303 Northway – Darien, GA 31305
www.jeanniereeves.com

http://www.facebook.com/jeanniereevesphotography

info@jreevesphotography.com
(912) 230-9112

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